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Nuts and Bolts: Corrections for St. Patrick’s Day

February 13, 2017

Nuts & Bolts – Corrections for St. Patrick‘s Day
 
Well, paint us green and call us a shamrock! It has been brought to our attention that GCU has missed the mark in two respects for appropriateness on St. Patrick‘s Day.
 
1. Paddy’s Day not Patty’s Day
As a nickname, St. Patty’s although seemingly a correct abbreviation for St. Patrick‘s in the U.S., is glaringly and offensively incorrect. The correct usage is St. Paddy’s.  
 
Why? Read here
 
Check your store to see if you’ve made this innocent error and get a head start by editing your cards. GCU will be returning cards with cover or inside text of “St. Patty’s” for edits.  
 
2. Shamrock vs Lucky four-leaved Clover
The four-leaf clover, although validly a symbol of good luck, is not related to Ireland nor St. Patrick‘s Day. The shamrock, three-leaved clover, however, is and here is why.  The plant was used by Saint Patrick to illustrate the doctrine of the Trinity (3). It has subsequently become a national symbol of Ireland. The word comes from seamróg, the Irish name for the plant.
 
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At this time we will let designs with four-leaved clovers associated with St. Patrick‘s Day, Ireland and Irish remain on the site.  We will leaf, I mean leave, it to the artists’ discretion to make edits to these existing designs noting that sales may be affected.  New cards will be held to the three-leaf standard.  Four-leaf clovers of course can be used for any “good luck” occasion.
 
This is a good reminder as to the importance of knowing the nuances of different languages, cultures and holidays to make sure you’ve hit the nail on the head. Even if you think you’re a subject matter expert, doing a little research can be good inspiration for a fresh take or different angle.

 

The difference is made in the details!
Mindy
GCU Community Manager
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One Comment leave one →
  1. February 19, 2017 3:31 pm

    Thank you very much for this information!

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